How do you keep your conversation engaging?

Talking and listening to each other in a one-on-one conversation is usually great. In a friendly atmosphere talking face to face with an interesting person (and aren’t we all interesting creatures?) is a lot of fun. These conversation tips and fun games can help spark your conversation… 

  • Parlangi’s goal: a nice chat.

    After all, you learn a language mostly implicitly. Are you not allowed to explain language rules? Of course. But that is not the main point of your conversation, unless your conversation partner asks about it himself. Above all, you want to get to know each other a little, exchange experiences and stories, help each other, have a pleasant time. And you learn a lot from each other while doing so! Lots of fun!

  • Humans have two ears and one mouth.

    And that is no coincidence. Being able to listen is even more important than being able to talk.

    – Ask open questions and additional questions.
    – Nod in agreement.
    – Reply.

    Whether you can effectively listen a lot depends on the personality and language skills of your conversation partner. In the beginning of a language learning process it is normal that you mainly listen and tell less yourself. Yet the language learner learns a lot by listening to what is being told.

  • Use the chat function during video chat (bottom left of your video screen). You can type text or paste links from websites, images or videos. Sometimes it can also help to draw a picture. So keep a pen and paper ready.
  • Sometimes it is fun to play a (language) game.

    Some nice examples:

    – True or False?
    Tell a story. The other guesses whether the story is true or false.

    – Draw a picture of a moment that you have fond memories of. The other tells what he or she thinks can be seen in the drawing. Then you tell yourself which good memory the drawing represents.

    Tell a story together.
    You say one sentence. The other says the next sentence and so you continue to build your own crazy story.
    You can adapt the game by saying one or two words each, after which the other adds one or two words…

    – Associate.
    You say one word. The other says a word that he or she thinks of, based on your word. You say a word that comes to your mind with the other’s word… and so on. This exercise is about pleasure and lowering the speaking anxiety. It can also be inspiring to find new conversation topics. 

  • Some challenging questions to use in your conversations:

    – What would you love to do someday?
    – What is your favourite country, colour, animal, TV program, food, book, film, sport…? Why?
    – What’s the best thing you’ve ever done?
    – What is your first childhood memory?
    – What would you do if you won the lottery?
    – …

    We would love to hear your conversation tips. Share them with us via ‘contact’.